How Now, Brown Cow?

Bibliographic Information: Schertle, A., & Schaffer, A. (1994). How now, brown cow?. San Diego: Browndeer Press.

Brief Annotation: Can we actually know what a cow thinks? With this book we can, a book filled with poems that takes the reader into the mind and heart of a cow.

Genre: Poetry

Grade Level: K-2

Readers who will like this: Readers that enjoy books about animals; children who enjoy rhyming; children who like poetry.

Rating/ Response: 4 – It is a great book that can be used for multiple things such as phonics and rhyming. It is a fun book filled with vivid illustrations .

One question you would ask before a read aloud: Have you ever wondered what animals are thinking about?

Reading Strategy: Inferences

Rationale for strategy: This book has the deeper meaning about what the purpose of cows are in this world and all of the things they offer us human beings.

Posted by: Yesenia Corral

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A River Ran Wild: An Environmental History

Bibliographic Information: Cherry, Lynne. A River Ran Wild: An Environmental History. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1992.

Brief Annotation: Nash-a-way which means, River with the Pebbled Bottom was first inhibited by the tribe of Indians under Chief Weeawa, who respected and cared for the river. Over time, settlers took over the land and built factories for producing goods that polluted the Nashua River. After a dream from Chief Weeawa, Marion worked to restore the Nashua River back to its purity.

Genre: Historical Fiction

Grade Level:  3-4

Readers who will like this: Children who like nature and the environment will especially enjoy A River Ran Wild. They will be able to see how things in nature have changed over time through story, as well as beautiful illustrations. The book may also spark an interest in children who want to make a change to help the environment.

Rating/Response: 3 I enjoyed how the book described an important idea without making it seem too educational and instead made it enjoyable to read. The imagery portrayed the story very well and showed how the river progressed through time.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: What do you think your neighborhood looked like before your house was built? Draw a picture of your neighborhood before you lived there.

Reading Strategy: Important Ideas

Rationale for Strategy: Children will gain a better understanding how things were in the past and how humans and technology have impacted the environment over time. Children will learn to appreciate nature and learn ways to preserve and restore the environment.

By: Kelsey Peterson

Ginger

Bibliographic Information: Voake, Charlotte. Ginger. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick, 2001. Print.

Brief Annotation: This story is about a very happy cat, Ginger who very much enjoys his life – however, one day his owner brings home a kitten and this forces Ginger to adjust his lifestyle.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: K-1

Readers who will like this: Readers that enjoy books about every day problems they may face will treasure this book – it provides precious illustrations and a great ending.

Rating/ Response: 4 – This story did a great job of sharing a moral and then providing a solution which could be easily related to the lives of the students.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: Have you ever had someone who annoyed you?

Reading Strategy: Making Connections

Rationale for strategy: Students should easily be able to make connections between this story and its moral to their own lives. The teacher could also make connections to the behavioral model she is establishing in the classroom.

Posted by: Katie de St. Aubin

Science Fair Bunnies

Bibliographic Information: Lasky, Kathryn, and Marylin Hafner. Science Fair Bunnies. Cambridge, MA: Scholastic, 2001. Print.

Brief Annotation: This story is about two friends who make the tough decision to donate their lost teeth to science after their initial plan failed.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: K-2

Readers who will like this: Students who enjoy reading about science or characters who are around the same age as they are will enjoy reading this thrilling tale of two friends.

Rating/ Response: 4 – This story did a fantastic job with illustrations and a cute story which can be easily related to many students and their lives.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: Who has ever taken part in or visited a science fair?

Reading Strategy: Important Ideas

Rationale for strategy: There are various points throughout this story where the main character is forced to make a change – teachers can have students point out these important ideas and discuss them.

Posted by: Katie de St. Aubin

The Story Goes On

Bibliographic Information: Fisher, Aileen, and Mique Moriuchi. The Story Goes on. Brookfield, CT: Roaring Brook, 2005. Print.

Brief Annotation: This story provides a real-life examples of the circle of life and presents it in a kid-friendly manner. Using plants and animals students are familiar with, they are able to understand this process.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: 1-3

Readers who will like this: Students will enjoy this book because the pictures are interesting and the scientific process that is explained is described very well.

Rating/ Response: 5 – This story does a fantastic job of bringing the readers in because of the eye-catching illustrations and the poetic use of the story.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: What can you tell me about the circle of life?

Reading strategy: Free Choice

Rationale for strategy: Even though I chose free choice, this book has some great elements that could work with science as well. Student would be able to analyze the process and maybe make up their own.

Posted by: Katie de St. Aubin

Babushka’s Doll

Bibliographic Information: Polacco, P. (1990). Babushka’s doll. New York: Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers.

Brief Annotation: Natasha hates waiting for things, but with playing with a doll only once, she finds out the true meaning of patience and politeness.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: 1-2

Readers who will like this: Children who like fables; children who enjoy problem solving.

Rating/ Response: 5 It is a great book, with simple vocabulary and vivid illustrations, children can really think about the meaning of the story.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: Think about a time you were impatient with a family member, do you think that was a nice thing to do?

Reading strategy: Inferences

Rationale for strategy: Students are able to use this book to learn how to draw conclusions from the evidence presented because it has a lot of meaning behind the words.

Posted by: Yesenia Corral

Mrs. Watson Wants Your Teeth

Bibliographic Information: McGhee, Alison, and Harry Bliss. Mrs. Watson Wants Your Teeth. Orlando, FL: Voyager / Harcourt, 2008. Print.

Brief Annotation: This young girl is entering first grade believing comments made by a second grader about the first grade teacher – and we embark on her first day of school as she attempts to keep her mouth closed all day.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: 1

Readers who will like this: This story will be easily related to students who are around this age because they probably had the same feelings of anxiety. It can be a funny way to see their worries from a different and humorous perspective.

Rating/ Response: 5 – I thought this story did a fantastic job of making the next page unknown and forcing the children to ask questions and infer what they think is going to happen.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: Who has ever heard something about a teacher before meeting them?

Reading strategy: Questioning

Rationale for strategy: The uncertainty of each page leaves room for the students to question what they think is going to happen next. There are endless possibilities for making predictions and guesses about how the story is going to end.

Posted by: Katie de St. Aubin

The Sailor’s Alphabet

Bibliographic Information: McCurdy, Michael. The Sailors Alphabet. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998. Print.

Brief Annotation: This story travels through the 26 letter of the alphabet in terms of a United States Navy frigate – analyzing parts of the ship and the daily tasks of the sailors.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: K-2

Readers who will like this: Students will have an interest in history will enjoy this book because it depicts the daily life of a sailor.

Rating/ Response: 3 – This story accurately represents each of the letters of the alphabet and relates each with a part of the frigate. However, I wish there was more history included.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: Who knows what a frigate is?

Reading strategy: Social Studies

Rationale for strategy: This story covers the importance of the building of America – before machines took over. Many men and boys spent their lives on ships – and this story helps us to see the lives they lived.

Posted by: Katie de St. Aubin

The Cowboy ABC

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Bibliographic Information: Demarest, Chris. The Cowboy ABC. New York: DK Publishing Inc, 1999. Print.

Brief Annotation: This story addresses every letter of the alphabet while tying each letter back to western lifestyles.  It is a fun way to show letters in a themed direction.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: K-1

Readers who will like this: Readers who are learning to memorize their alphabet, or are learning how to sound each letter out will find this book extremely helpful.

Rating/ Response: 4 – This book is fun, and can be entertaining to boys who have a passion for cowboys.  It can be fun for them to relate to something of their gender for once.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: What do you know about cowboys and western lifestyles?

Reading Strategy: Free Choice (Picture)

Rationale for Strategy: Students will correlate letters to objects of many sorts.

Posted by: Alexa Wachter

The Snowy Day

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Bibliographic Information: Keats, Ezra Jack. The Snowy Day. New York: Penguin Books, 1962. Print.

Brief Annotation: This story is about a young boy that discovers what he can do in snow.  The activities he finds himself doing are endless.  Students will love see and hearing what the young boy finds fun about snow.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: K-1

Readers who will like this: Readers who learning about snow, or about describing what actions are and how to use them will find this book particularly interesting.

Rating/ Response: 4 – This book is carefree, fun, and innovative for children as they explore what activities to spend their day with.  It has great pictures and words that are easy to read or understand.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: What do you like to do in the snow?  Why?

Reading Strategy: Free Choice (Picture)

Rationale for Strategy: Students can brainstorm what snow is, how it feels, smells, reacts to human contact, and will learn how to write about their daily activities.

Posted by: Alexa Wachter