When Sophie Gets Angry–Really, Really Angry…

Bibliographic Information: Bang, M. (1999). When Sophie Gets Angry–Really, Really Angry…. New York: Blue Sky Press.

Brief Annotation: Emotions are one of the main aspects of our lives and as children grow, they are learning how to handle their emotions.  This book addresses the topic of anger and what a certain person does when they are angry.

Genre: Making Connections

Grade Level: Pre-K-3

Readers who will like this: Any student or reader who has ever been angry can relate to this book.  When I was little, I would “run away” when I was frustrated or angry but never went too far.  It definitely helped me cool off and I think this is something a lot of readers can relate to.

Rating/Response: 3.5  I think this book provides children with a great basis for discussion on the topic of anger.  Instead of running away, a discussion can be brought up about what else can be done instead of running away.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: When we get angry, we do certain things.  What do you do when you get angry?

Reading Strategy: Making Connections

Rationale for Strategy: I chose this book because all students get angry and some get more angry than others.  Having a discussion about anger is important in the classroom because it can let students see that they aren’t the only ones that get angry sometimes.  It also lets the teacher see how students handle their anger.

Posted by: Brittany Billiet

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The Keeping Quilt

Bibliographic Information: Polacco, P. (1988). The Keeping Quilt. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Brief Annotation: All families have different traditions that keep them together.  Whether it be passing down jewelry of an ancestor or quilts like the one used in this book, they hold a special place in the hearts of many.  This book discusses how much a quilt means to a family and it is a way for children to relate to their own lives and their own traditions.

Genre: Making Connections

Grade Level: Pre-K-3

Readers who will like this: I believe that anyone would enjoy this book for its drawings and great story.  Children love being able to relate to anything they can and this is a book where children can do this.

Rating/Response: 4.5  I loved reading this book.  I found it interesting because it implemented not only a tradition but a culture as well.  Some children may be Jewish or Russian in class and this would be a book they would love, and I think that is important.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: Thinking of your home life, do you have any traditions?  What are they?

Reading Strategy: Making Connections

Rationale for Strategy: I chose this book because we all have traditions or memories that we love to keep near and dear to our hearts.  I think that being able to share these with classmates is something we all love because it is what separates us from others and makes us unique.

Posted by: Brittany Billiet

Wemberly Worried

 
Bibliographic Information: Henkes, Kevin. Wemberly Worried. New York: Greenwillow, 2000.

Brief Annotation: Wemberly worries about the big things and the small things. She worries about the tree in her yard and the crack in the living room wall. Wemberly’s biggest worry is going to school, but she brings her stuffed rabbit Petal with her. However, once Wemberly arrives she meets Jewel  and they become friends. Wemberly forgets to worry… some of the time.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: K-2

Students will enjoy this book if they have ever worried about something. They will be able to relate with Wemberly as she battles her fear of going to school.

Rating/Response: 4. I enjoyed Wemberly Worried because I find myself worrying about everything. My friends always express that I just need to relax and not worry about things. Wemberly was a character I was able to relate with, which made the reading more enjoyable.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: What is something you worry about?

Reading Strategy: Making Connections

Rationale for Strategy: Every one worries about something and almost everyone has worried about the first day of school! Students will be able to connect with Wemberly as she experiences her first day of school and overcomes some of her fears.

Posted by: Kelsey Peterson

Roxaboxen

Bibliographic Information: McLerran, Alice, and Barbara Cooney. Roxaboxen. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard, 1991.

Brief Annotation: A group of children who lived near each other made a town called Roxaboxen. They created Roxaboxen using pebbles to outline streets and houses. The children explored the area using the things they found. Using their imagination, Roxaboxen had horses, jails, and wars. Although the children grew old or moved away, they never forgot their town of Roxaboxen.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: 1-3

Reader who will like this: Students will enjoy this book because it allows them to use their imagination. They will be able to make connections in times during their life where they created imaginary things.

Rating/Response: 3. I enjoyed Roxaboxen because it made me think of my childhood playing with Barbies. We formed families, created jobs and decorated their houses. I found the light-hearted book to be easily relatable.

One question you would ask before a read aloud:  What are some things you have imagined?

Reading Strategy: Making Connections

Rationale for Strategy: While reading Roxaboxen students can make connections to their own lives where they have used their imagination to create things. Students will find this book easily relatable to their own lives.

Posted by: Kelsey Peterson

Bibliographic Information: Hoffman, Mary, and Caroline Binch. Amazing Grace. New York: Dial for Young Readers, 1991. Print.

Brief Annotation: This is a story about a young girl named Grace, who is highly imaginative. She wants to try out for the role of Peter Pan in her classroom play, but her classmates tell her that she cannot possibly be Peter because she is black and she is a girl. Grace overcomes her classmates’ criticisms of her aspirations and achieves her dreams brilliantly.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: K – 6

Reader who will like this: This is a story that any reader would enjoy, even older readers. It discusses ethical issues, discrimination, bullying, and so on, in a manner that makes sense for kids.

Rating/Response: 5 – What a beautifully written story about a young girl who perseveres and achieves her goal. This story discusses larger issues such as racism and sexism in a way that is appropriate for children as well.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: Has anyone ever told you that you are amazing? If so, describe what you did and how you felt. If not, think of a time when you did something amazing and describe it. Why was it amazing?

Reading Strategy: Making Connections

Rationale for Strategy: Students can make connections between the plot of the story and the major themes portrayed throughout. They can relate the story and the main character’s experiences to their own.

Posted by: Emma Henke

Stellaluna

Bibliographic Information: Cannon, Janell. Stellaluna. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1993. Print.

Brief Annotation: This is a beautifully written story about a young bat, Stellaluna, who is separated from her mother before she is old enough to fly. She learns many lessons about survival and friendship as the story progresses. At the end of the story, there is a section of factual information about bats as well.

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Grade Level: K – 6

Reader who will like this: I feel as though this book would be appealing to all types of readers. It is imaginative, informational, and creative.

Rating/Response: 5 – This book is a book with honors for a reason. It is humorous yet touching at the same time.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: What is your background knowledge in regards to bats?

Reading Strategy: Making Connections

Rationale for Strategy: Students can make connections between the book and factual information about bats. Students can also make connections to how the story is about more than just bats, but about the essence of friendship.

Posted by: Emma Henke

One Monkey Too Many

Bibliographic Information: Koller, Jackie French., and Lynn Munsinger. One Monkey Too Many. San Diego: Harcourt Brace, 1999. Print.

Brief Annotation: This book is all about numbers and the amount of monkeys that can fit in certain situations.  The book starts with one monkey being able to do something and it counts up to five.  The monkeys are not well-behaved, so when they are told that only one monkey can be on a bike they misbehave and have two monkeys on a bike.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: Kindergarten-4

Reader who will like this: Students who enjoy numbers will enjoy this book and also students who like silly books that make them laugh.

Rating/Response: 4, this book is extremely silly and will get a good laugh out of the students.  It is also a very easy book to read with a few rhyming words and would be a good book for students to read by themselves.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: Can anyone tell me anything about the monkeys on this cover?  Do we think these monkeys are good and innocent or are they trouble-makers?

Reading Strategy: Making Connections

Rationale for Strategy: Students can easily make connections with this book to many different things.  The monkeys do certain things that are very normal for students to do as well, like riding bikes and eating at a table.  They should also be able to make connections with the numbers of the monkeys and some things we have learned in math before.

Posted by: Breanna Richey

The Relatives Came

Bibliographic Information: Rylant, Cynthia. The Relatives Came. New York: Bradbury, 1985

Brief Annotation: The relatives are coming to visit!  They drive from far away, and spend the summer visiting, hugging, and tending the garden.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: Kindergarten-3

Readers who will like this: Students who enjoy stories about large families, or travelling.

Rating/Response: 4 -This book has beautiful pictures and the story is easy for children to relate to.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: Have you ever gone on a trip to visit relatives?

Reading Strategy: Making Connections

Rationale for Strategy: This book is a wonderful way to introduce making text to self connections.  All students have relatives of some kind, and most of them will have gone on a trip of some sort, or had relatives visit.

Posted by: Olivia Cyr

Joseph had a little Overcoat

Bibliographic Information: Taback, Simms. Joseph Had a Little Overcoat. New York: Viking, 1999. Print..

Brief Annotation: This book is about a man name Joseph, who wanted to keep his overcoat as long as possible, but it got old and worn, so he made different things with the overcoat cloth.

Grade Level: K-2

Readers who will like this: Children who are visual or likes to do art.

Rating/Response: 4 I thought this book was a great read because it can show what a person can make or do with an overcoat.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: What do you think Joseph will do with the overcoat?

Reading Strategy: Making Connection

Rationale for Strategy: This book would be great at making connections because students can look at a big picture and continue to make smaller crafts out of it.

Posted by: Lisa Lor

Wemberly Worried

Bibliographic Information: Henkes, Kevin. Wemberly Worried. Hong Kong: Greenwillow Books, 2000. Print.

Brief Annotation: A story about a young mouse who worries all the time.  When it comes time for her to go to school, she finds even more things to worry about.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level: K

Readers who will like this: Children who get nervous about trying new things, children who like reading about Animals, or children who enjoy stories by Kevin Henke.

Rating/Response: 4 The illustrations are adorable, and the story is very easy to connect to.  Students will be very engaged in the story.

One question you would ask before a read aloud: Turn to a partner and talk about a time you worried.

Reading Strategy: Connections

Rationale for Strategy: Every student will have had at least one experience about being nervous.  They will understand how Wemberly feels, and will easily be able to make connections with this sweet mouse.

Posted by: Emily Busch